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Understanding the Millennial Workforce

Understanding the Millennial Workforce

To understand the motivations of the Millennial generation is to crack one of the great codes of modern staffing. Companies across a wide variety of industries are anxious to better understand what a Millennial workforce means to their business, and the insurance industry is no exception. While there is some disagreement on the exact years by which the Millennial generation is defined, it is safe to consider individuals born anywhere between the early 1980s and late 1990s, possibly even into the early 2000s, as potential Millennials. The importance of identifying the thought processes, habits and motivations of a generation lies in the magnitude of the information. There is no larger demographic that offers a wider berth of insight than generational identification.

What’s a Millennial?

There has never before been a generational group that has faced more scrutiny in terms of identifying and understanding than the Millennials. In the world of big data and near-instant assessment, the research and information regarding Millennials seems to change almost daily. Some researchers refer to Millennials as the Peter Pan generation, referring to their propensity to delay certain rites of passage long thought to represent the transition into adulthood (i.e. marriage, career, etc.). Other researchers point to studies that suggest Millennials are more likely to exhibit narcissism than older adults, implying they are more self-indulged and self-entitled than previous generations. Still others argue that of the basic characteristics that define each generation, Millennials possess the traits that suggest they are more “civic-minded” and more similar to the G.I. Generation (also referred to as the Greatest Generation) in their sense of community.

What drives Millennials?

As the workforce of the insurance industry shifts to focus primarily on Millennials, companies are scrambling to attract the best and brightest this generation has to offer. To do this it is important to find what motivates Millennials and consider how your organization can leverage those factors in your favor. As the definition of the Millennial generation has evolved, certain elements have changed or gone entirely extinct, but two important motivating factors that have continued to apply to Millennials is their quest for growth and meaning in their work. What this means is that Millennials are interested in careers in which they feel there is real potential for advancement. Millennials are also interested in careers in which they believe they are making a difference in the world. More than past generations, Millennials look at their employment as a reflection of their civic duty. Companies that can prove to be incubators for talent and that have a forward-thinking approach are the ones that will be most attractive to Millennials.

What are some Millennial misconceptions?

There is no shortage of misconceptions when it comes to Millennials. The Peter Pan comparison has carried with it an assumed lack of motivation and work ethic. This jump in logic has led to a negative connotation surrounding the work behaviors of Millennials, thus affecting the approach of companies when interviewing them. One of the most surprising misconceptions regarding Millennials is their loyalty. Many employers see this generation as being most apt to leave a company in pursuit of other opportunities, when in fact they are more loyal to employers than Gen-Xers. Underestimating the loyalty of Millennials can create an atmosphere of mistrust, hampering the possibility for success for both employer and employee.

One final note about Millennials, which is important to consider in regards to approach, is that they are the least likely to self-identify. Where as Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers have little trepidation when it comes to being referred to as their respective generational titles, Millennials largely dislike the act of being labeled. Despite being able to paint them with the same brush, to some extent, they are more responsive to being treated as individuals. It can be a bit confounding (and a bit frustrating) attracting and understanding Millennials, which is why partnering with a staffing agency like The James Allen Company is so vital. We continually read and research the literature related to not only the insurance industry, but the demographic of the people who will represent the largest portion of its workforce for the next several years.

Do you want MVPs or championship rings?

Do you want MVPs or championship rings?

For as long as sports journalists have been shoving tape recorders and microphones in the faces of successful coaches, we have been privy to their “secrets of success.” The responses have become so typical that we can recite them as if we are the Lombardis and Woodens of modern business. The responses rarely change and the secrets are hardly clandestine because the elements of success are pretty obvious:  talent, hard work and a team-first mentality. Each of those elements on their own can be helpful, but rarely do they translate into wins unless they work together. Staying ahead of the competition means delivering on all three levels, but what is the best way to maximize the opportunity for success in each area?

Talent

Think of the most naturally gifted athletes you’ve observed. They appear to be working hard, and they probably are, but they don’t seem exhausted. When the other players around them begin to lose their step, they step up. Talent is easy to recognize but hard to find. It’s also difficult to define. There’s a reason the most successful sports organizations in the world do not rely solely on their own inner office to discover and attract fresh talent. The scouting industry is a vital component to the efforts of championship teams. Having people who specialize in uncovering and attaining talent is the most effective way to ensure you have access to those individuals who rise above the crowd.

Hard Work

For as many talented individuals who have found success, there are far more who seemed to have that x-factor but never maximized their potential. Whether it was personal failures, injuries or other circumstances, for every Michael Jordon there is a Kwame Brown or Sam Bowie. What is more frustrating is when we watch players with loads of talent squander it because they’ve reached a level where they have to work in order to stay ahead and they just fail to do so. Talent alone isn’t enough if it’s not coupled with work ethic. This hearkens back to the benefit of a talent scout. They not only calculate the hardline statistics that signify talent, but they get to know the players they scout to better understand their drive and determination.

Team-first Mentality

The Patriots, the Yankees, the Bulls. These teams have exemplified what it takes to create a dynasty. They find talent that other teams either look over or under-utilize. They work harder than everyone else. And they concern themselves with team success over individual success. What we find when we examine these teams is that by focusing on team success, they found individual success. Talent rises higher when there is a great team around them to lift them farther up. This takes sacrifice, but sacrifice now means greater success later.

As executive recruiters specializing in the insurance industry, we at The James Allen Companies pride ourselves in finding talent that not only has the individual potential for success but also shows the greatest promise for making your organization better. We believe in continued success for everyone, and we know that everyone succeeds when talent fits with the team you’ve already cultivated. We are experts in locating and attracting candidates who would rather win championships than MVPs. We do this by sourcing and understanding individuals who have the talent, a proven history of hard work, and a team-first mentality.

The High Price of the Perfect Candidate

We’re all familiar with the adage, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, but as is the nature of clichés, they are so overused we sometimes lose sight of the inherent wisdom that made them clichés in the first place. As companies set out in search of their next employee, they set their sights high and hold out hope that this next hire will be the master-of-all-trades at an entry-level cost. While they may not always be quite so farfetched with their hopes, too often we see clients lose out on excellent candidates because they believe that the next great employee is just around the corner. It may seem as though passing on a candidate in hopes a more perfect option presents itself is of little consequence, but passing over good candidates can be costly. Let’s discuss the three areas in which extending the search process can cost you:

Money

The most immediate and obvious effect of failing to secure candidate is the expense. Depending on the position, failing to have a candidate in place can mean you are failing to meet a level of productivity needed for growth and success. The longer you hold out for a candidate that may not even exist, the longer you extend the loss of productivity and the subsequent revenue that would accompany the productivity.

Morale

A question many fail to consider is this:  Is holding out for the perfect candidate worth the potential losses associated with a decline in team morale? If you have a particular positional need, it is likely your current staff is compensating for this need. The longer these employees feel as though they are taking the brunt of a labor shortage, the more demoralizing this can become. This ties in with the previous point of the financial effect, as a combination of a team stretched thin and waning endurance can amplify the cost of waiting for the perfect candidate.

The Bird in the Hand

Today’s market is more favorable to the job seeker. A disappointing reality is when a client realizes the candidate we originally presented is the superior choice, and they contact us to reestablish a connection, only to find that candidate is no longer on the market. Once a candidate is made aware of new prospects, they are less inhibited. This makes it very easy for your competition to swoop in and secure the talent you let walk, all in the hope that the perfect candidate would appear.

There are a couple things client companies can do to better analyze their staffing needs and weigh the risks of waiting for employees that may never come:

Talent on the Rise

Partner with a recruiter that understands your specific industry and has an eye for talent potential. Securing tomorrow’s best candidates today can be the best investment your company makes. Perhaps a candidate does not have the exact experience that you desire, but they have a combination of experiences that strongly suggests they could excel. Stepping out to meet these candidates may seem risky, but it is far less risky than leaving a gap in your staffing.

Find the Best Fit

A great resource when it comes to assessing a presented candidate is your existing staff. Look at your best employees and measure them against your ideal candidate. What you will find is that even your best employees no doubt came to you with room for improvement. Taking the time to consider the unique talents of your team will give you valuable perspective. It also gives you the opportunity to determine what might be missing in your staff, thus focusing how you measure prospective candidates. You may never find the perfect candidate, but with a strong recruiting partner and an assessment of your team, you can very well find the perfect fit.

Finding the right talent means finding the right recruiter

Finding the right talent means finding the right recruiter

If you’ve been in involved in multiple talent searches, then you know that each search is different. From the types of positions in need to the pool of candidates created, there is no perfect template that simplifies the search process and distills it into a one-size-fits-all operation. And if you have had your share of hiring experience, then you also know that the search for uniquely qualified candidates can be consuming of both your time and financial resources. It is no surprise many organizations turn to recruiters to assist with staffing needs, but what is startling is the number of hiring managers who don’t make the one-time investment of time to partner with the right recruiter. Finding the most fitting staffing specialist goes beyond the one or two open positions sitting in front of you. When the right recruiter is selected, the potential savings of time and money from future hires offers exponential value. The question many employers may have is as follows:  How do I know if I’m choosing the right recruiter?

Relationships

Quality recruiting firms approach clients in the same way the most successful organizations approach staffing agencies, with the intention of forming a strong partnership based on trust and mutual respect. Relationships are as unique as the parties involved, and the relationship between a recruiter and client has its own set of needs that both sides should satisfy to prove their commitment. For recruiters, they are searching for clients who display integrity and openness. But what should employers look for in a recruiter?

  • Look for a recruiter that not only delivers on candidates who fit the defined requirements of a company’s position, but also provide the intangible qualities that prove they are a culture-fit for the organization. This takes a recruiter who not only reads the job posting, but listens to their client to better understand their unique values.
  • The right recruiter doesn’t find value in simply making a placement but in knowing their placement is delivering on the promises made. Commitment beyond the agreement shows a recruiter is truly invested in a company’s success, thus truly invested in the relationship.
  • Throughout the search process, the right recruiter consistently provides value-based services. Going beyond delivering a list of candidates, invested recruiters work with their clients to ensure the best applicant is selected. They offer clients the insight they need to attract the talent they want.

Industry Knowledge

We often have a better understanding of the things we care about. We commit more time and energy into things in which we feel truly vested. The right recruiter should care about not only making placements but about making the right placements. In order to make the right placement, the right recruiter should have clear and discernible insight into two industries: theirs and yours.

  • As you are no doubt invested in the best practices for your particular business, a quality staffing specialist needs to be devoted to their craft. The right recruiter is rarely the least expensive recruiter. Instead of offering their services below market value, a reputable recruiter knows the value in their services and can speak to them with clarity and competency.
  • Additionally, the right recruiter is often one that specializes in your industry. Either through years of research or direct experience within your specific field, the recruiter that stands the best chance of meeting your needs is the one who truly understands them. Established niche recruiters survive and succeed because they know more than how to find candidates, but they know how to find candidates who truly understand and are invested in the industry in which they serve.

Whatever your industry and staffing needs may be, you are best served in both the short and long term by fostering a strong relationship with a recruiter who is committed to your success and has the experience, both in your industry and as a recruiter, to provide that relationship what it needs to flourish. At The James Allen Companies, we know this to be true. With direct experience in the insurance industry and as search consultants, we have continually proven ourselves to be the right recruiter for insurance companies across the nation.

What Wayne Gretzky’s father teaches us about securing talent

What Wayne Gretzky’s father teaches us about securing talent

Walter Gretzky famously taught his son to “skate to where the puck is going, not where it has been.” Once his son became known as possibly the greatest hockey player of all time, this quote became elevated to an idiom of philosophical proportions. And for good reason. Gretzky’s advice was simple, clear and applicable to much more than the game of hockey. As recruiters, we are always trying to stay ahead of our clients’ needs, staying connected with highly-qualified candidates keeping ourselves informed on industry trends, all so that when a client comes to us with a need, we are already prepared with a bevy of talented individuals. But in what ways can you as hiring managers skate to where the puck is going as opposed to where it’s been?

Anticipate your talent needs

A staffing specialist is a great resource when your company needs to be reactive to a hiring need. They are an even greater asset when they can work with you proactively. Staffing is a business built on relationships, and if your company foresees openings within different departments and for different positions, an experienced recruiter can begin to sift through the pool of candidates, engaging those that could prove to be fruitful prospects. This amplifies the value of having a strong relationship with an industry-specific recruiter. They work to truly understand the nuances of your business, so that when a hiring need does arise, expectedly or otherwise, they are prepared to deliver candidates that not only match the desired qualifications but also the culture of your company. They have their finger on the pulse of talent and can move you to where the puck is going to be before it even starts moving.

Skate to where the talent is going

The best talent will only move laterally so often, and unless you are offering intrinsic value that is unmatched, those candidates are far less likely to leave their company for a lateral move. In fact, while 89% of employees would consider a lateral move within their company, only 27% would consider a lateral move to a different employer. So when you are looking for your next underwriting manager or claims manager, be prepared to consider talented and established candidates for whom these roles could be seen as a step up. The earlier you secure this talent, the better chance you have of retaining it. If you’re too hesitant to put yourself in position to receive this talent, someone else will, leaving your company to play catch up in the talent game.

Outhustle the competition

As we’ve already established, you’re not the only team occupying the skating rink, and you’re not the only skater on the ice. Talent is a finite source, and other companies are anxious to capitalize on it. If you’ve made the moves necessary to get in position (requested necessary documents, scheduled interviews), then you’re headed in the right direction. But if you’re hesitant to take the shot, then be prepared to lose that talent to a competitor. If the pieces fit, it is not the time to hold out for a better shot or try and put yourself in a more favorable position. Basically, to end on another infamous Gretzky quote, “you miss 100 percent of the shots you never take.”

Are You Making Hiring Too Hard On Yourself? Agency Partners Can Help

Are You Making Hiring Too Hard On Yourself? Agency Partners Can Help

Corporate recruiters and internal HR managers are often faced with a daunting number of tasks to get the recruiting and hiring process underway and completed within a certain timeframe. This leads to stressed employees who struggle under unrealistic expectations and often settle for poor candidates who make due when a deadline looms.

That’s nerve wracking for everyone, especially if you’re large enough to always be hiring. It leads to burnout and a feeling that every person is a liability, not an asset. Your team deserves the help they need to hire properly and the freedom to focus on the people who will make your company better.

As an agency partner, we’re here to streamline the process and get you focused on securing the candidate. Your success is our success, which is why we provide three big benefits.

Get Access to the Best Talent Pool

Employee referrals are one of the best sources for hiring qualified talent who are happy in a new position and fit well within a company’s existing culture. People know their friends and former coworkers and can imagine them honestly in a new setting.

A review of recruiting in 2016 from Lever found that employee referrals account for about 16% of total hires, and a referred employee is 10 times more likely to be hired than a candidate who applies in the traditional way.

How can an agency like The James Allen Companies help you capture more referrals? We have the benefit of access to highly-qualified applicants. We also have a broad range of referral services and are often the first place people suggest when their friend or former coworker is looking for a new place of employment.

Candidates test the waters with recruiters because we allow them to see what’s available. Building a strong relationship with us provides you access to top talent looking for a change.

Pull Out The Weeds Right Away

You have make-it-or-break-it elements in your hiring process based on your experience. These can include needing someone who is a team player, having versatility so that every position is comfortable making presentations, or needing references for specific knowledge and skills.

When you get to the interview process, explaining these to each candidate and then doing your verification can take time and will often require work beyond the interview. This adds days to the process, slowing you down and forcing you to live with a skill gap for longer periods of time.

Recruitment agencies like us can help get these general questions and requirements out of the way for you before the candidate ever lands on your desk leaving you with a prioritized list of candidates that meet your requirements, allowing you to select from the best after we’ve separated the wheat from the chaff of the initial applicants.

Avoid the Common “No”

Candidates will decline job offers sometimes, which makes the arduous hiring process someone even more painful. Not only are we experts in helping you find the right talent for your needs, but we also can provide an additional ear for the candidate to learn about reservations and concerns, then help you to address those and turn a “no” into a “yes!”

We create a substantial number of opportunities to highlight why they should join you for the betterment of their careers. We gauge how a candidate may react to a counter offer from their employer, address resignation cold feet by showcasing your values, and maintain a clean line to candidates where they can ask us questions, encouraging consistent communication.

We Help, Not Hurt, Your Chance of Success

Remember, a talent agency like The James Allen Companies is just another weapon in your arsenal. You can use us tactically so that we bolster and support your hiring success, without harming your reputation or your standing.

Some corporate recruiters or HR managers will look down on getting outside help or see it as something that hurts their pride on an individual level. However, we work with you to find and land the best candidates, so you’ll actually be able to take pride in how well you’re performing when it comes to doing what’s right for your team, management, and company health.

You’re best candidate isn’t going to wait, and neither should you. Discover them today.

Are You Offering New Hires the One Thing They All Absolutely Want?

Are You Offering New Hires the One Thing They All Absolutely Want?

If you aren’t motivating candidates to work for you, then you’re missing the boat when it comes to landing today’s best talent.

Your current staff most likely already has their own motivation for coming to work, and those reasons are as varied as the people who enter your doors each day. During the hiring process it’s your job to determine at least one motivating factor for your preferred candidates and show them how your company can satisfy this.

Discovering and presenting the right motivation can boost morale, employee respect, productivity, and foster a working environment that people want to stay in for years to come.

Let’s Get Honest About Money

One of the biggest motivating factors for someone selecting a job is the belief that the work is personally meaningful. This is followed by (and studies differ on the order) feeling relevant, doing work that benefits society, stability, overcoming challenges, establishing a career path with advancement opportunity and the job making them feel happy or empowering them to pursue other things that make them happy.

Money rarely makes these lists of top motivational factors, but it always plays a role in overall motivation. Salary, benefits, bonuses, and other compensation allow your staff to acquire the standard of living they require to meet their needs and attain the lifestyle they desire.

The good news is that fair benefits and pay have always been a cornerstone of securing the talent a business needs. Providing for your employees allows them to pursue the motivations at work and in their daily lives, creating a strong underpinning for success.

Today’s market favors the job seeker, especially in high-skilled areas. Therefore, money should at least be treated like a basic motivation, and your offer will go much further when it is competitive.

Time to Look Past Money

One top factor in hiring and retaining the best and brightest is your ability to foster development.

Improvements in skills, capabilities and career have been and continue to be top motivational factors for staff of all ages and levels. What this means for your leadership is that they need to have a clear plan for helping your team and new employees improve themselves.

The Harvard Business Review puts it another way: “if you’re not helping people develop, you’re not management material.”

Their review  found that upwards of 90% of training and preparation for advancement takes place on the job and that employees understand this — even if they can’t peg the number, they understand that to advance they need to work in a place that will help.

These programs should be made apparent immediately. Older workers and younger workers feel they’ve earned the right to know how you plan to improve their professional lives.

Think of it this way: today’s worker doesn’t have an entitled attitude, they are empowered by the job market. Gallup notes that 93% of millennials left their company when they changed roles, and many cited that progression was unclear or they believed it had no growth opportunity.

That percentage of workers leaving their jobs shows little variation for other age groups when it accounts for employees who saw little to no opportunity for growth.

How Can You Motivate?

Not only is every person different, every office is too. There’s not one single thing that will work for everyone who reads this. However, there are a few proven methods you can try to establish at your organization that are also appropriate to discuss during an interview or the negotiation process.

  • Creating work holidays and celebrations. Building tradition helps your organization feel more like a family and create a bond of commitment.
  • Employee recognition programs. You don’t have to do anything too elaborate, but it should come off as genuine. When done in an honest way, it’s typically the best method to create motivation and build trust.
  • Provide ongoing training. Whether in-house or outsourced, training taps into motivations for personal, career and skills growth, which is important to most of your workforce.
  • Give employees control. Some motivations are best left in the hands of your employees, such as the ability to set and meet reach goals, taking responsibility for success and recognition. Tell potential hires that you have leeway for success and failure, plus you give your employees a chance to recognize each other when something comes together especially well.
  • Keep decision-making clear. No, don’t tell candidates that they’re going to sit in meetings all the time. This is about discussing how everyone is held to the same standard and ensuring them that everyone knows what that standard is. Clear expectations promote healthy relationships, foster development and make employees feel like their opinions and experiences are valid.

Those are just a few things your leadership can do to boost existing retention rates as well as come off as a top career destination for your next round of candidates. Be sure to check out our other advice on understanding today’s market that favors job candidates and how to target mid-level professionals as well as rising talent.

Are You Ready for a Market that Favors Job Candidates?

Are You Ready for a Market that Favors Job Candidates?

It’s a job seeker’s market, especially if you need to hire skilled, specific labor. If you haven’t adjusted your interview practices since the crash of 2008, you could be missing out on the best new talent in years.

Here are a few things you should consider when it comes to addressing, understanding and treating candidates in a good job market to land the big fish you need.

Understand the Market Realities

Minimum wage bumps have helped low-wage workers see their pay rise, while high earners continue to thrive as more of the competition (typically boomers) retire. It’s in the middle where things get a little tricky.

Men working in the middle-income space are starting to do better, but most of their gains are still focused on reaching pre-recession levels. Women are performing better than they were before the recession. Overall families are doing better.

Economists estimate $70,000 is what a family of four requires to adequately meet their needs in most places in the U.S. With lowering rates of unemployment, salary becomes the primary focus for many job seekers. This can translate to paying top dollar for highly-qualified candidates.

You can find a detailed analysis of what the job market means for different earners here.

Try to Get 75% of What You Want

Today’s employees want room to grow their careers, and that means opportunities for growth within your company. If you’re hiring candidates who have everything you need and want, they may feel stifled and unable to develop professionally within their roles.

By seeking someone who has most of what you want and the potential to learn the rest, you’re able to find a hungry employee that sees you as their career partner for years to come.

Growth and development matter and is often an overlooked, non-monetary incentive. When you’re discussing this with potential hires, showcase the potential for growth as a benefit.

Learn How to Translate What Candidates Ask For

Today’s job-seekers aren’t shy. They’re willing to ask for what they want, but it isn’t always said in standard business language so you might need to do some translation. Here are four “wants” we often hear from candidates and how you can translate them in your interviews and offers.

  1. I want to better myself: The employee will make choices focusing on personal development goals, such as learning a new skill or obtaining a new degree/qualification. You can highlight CE credits, financial support or ongoing learning opportunities you provide.
  2. I want to develop my skills: This is a little different because it signals an intent to grow through skills related directly to their job. It signifies a desire to grow within a role or unit, so discuss that possibility instead of a management track.
  3. I want to expand my career: This is where the management track comes into play. Discuss what you look for in people today who will be leaders tomorrow, plus make note of training or opportunities you provide to help people grow into that development role.
  4. I want work to be a challenge: Some people thrive in challenging environments, not only learning new tasks but also taking risks with new products and services. They do, however, run the risk of becoming bored. If you’re looking to expand into new realms, showcase these opportunities to candidates who want to be tested.

Make a Desirable Offer

You deserve to hear the plain truth: most offers we see fail just aren’t good enough. They tend to barely provide a lateral move, skimp on the benefits and don’t showcase the intrinsic value of the company.

The hard truth is that you’re most likely going to be interviewing talented people who already have jobs. Unemployment continues to decline, especially for skilled professionals, so your offer needs to be able to lure them away from their present company.

The good news is that you can ask what a candidate is looking for and consider what you can offer. Do they want flexible time or prefer to start (and end) the day a little later? Do they need certain benefits or want to make sure you’ll give them an afternoon off for their kid’s graduation in the spring?

All of the elements we’ve looked at before are necessary for a strong offer. Discuss what makes you unique, the flexibility you can offer, benefits, equality issues, room for growth and anything else that you would want to hear if you were on the other side of the table.

How To Sell Your Carrier To Top Talent: 3 Smart Decisions Designed to Showcase Your Values And 2 Bonuses to Help Close the Deal

How To Sell Your Carrier To Top Talent: 3 Smart Decisions Designed to Showcase Your Values And 2 Bonuses to Help Close the Deal

Competition in today’s job market isn’t only a concern for job seekers but for companies trying to attract top talent as well. Every interview is a two-way street where both company and candidate are looking for the best fit.

Countless online directories provide compensation estimates by job description in your area, lending potential hires valuable insight to income potential. That leaves your company’s culture and values as key differentiators.

You typically get three chances to present your values to each prospect, so here are the biggest things to check for with each opportunity, plus a couple of helpful hints that can take your hiring game one step further.

For the Listing: Focus on Freedom and Growth Benefits

When most people look at a large employer, they foresee a future that involves navigating internal politics and climbing a ladder that is complex but has plenty of rungs. You can use this to your benefit by noting ways your organization overcomes presuppositions, from flexible placements to progressive benefit options.

Sharing these cultural benefits in your job listing and description gives the impression to prospects that you are a company who is willing to provide the freedoms that studies from Gallup, Monster and others say are important.

On the Web: Your Site Should Cater to Customers and Candidates

You’ve likely come across company websites that showcase their corporate responsibility, volunteer work, environmental-friendliness and other positive traits outside of their normal operations. All of these efforts are designed to improve the company’s standing in the eyes of both customers and potential employees.

Today’s job seekers want to know that a company shares their values and culture. Your website is the launching pad from which this connection is made. This information should also be provided on your “Careers” page and the landing pages you provide in your job descriptions out on the Web.

Don’t be shy about the work you’ve done. If you’ve made a commitment to hiring more veterans, given to a specific charity, conducted food drives or other actions, share these. Go beyond just publishing your values and showcase them with company news and events to make your website attractive to the people who may want to work for you.

In the Room: Discuss Your Company Philosophy

Candidates often ask “what do you like about working here?” because they want to know that your environment is enjoyable. You can get ahead of this question and deliver all that information by discussing what you, as an individual, enjoy about your company and how it relates to the overall company philosophy.

Stick to tangibles such as the way that the company treats you and how easy it is to collaborate and solve problems, if there’s a favorite community service activity in which you’re engaged, speak to it and how it adds to your company’s culture and values.

Gallup has included “I have a best friend at work” in its core list of dimensions that describe great workgroups since the 1990s because people who agree with the sentiment report much higher levels of receiving and giving praise, making commitments to quality and feeling like their job is important. If you’ve made friends at work, it can be a positive thing to mention.

Bonus 1: Ditch Stock Photos for Real Photos

People respond very positively to images on a career page, especially when they’re interesting photos. But, you get the biggest bang for your buck when you create your own. Capture people and places as they naturally happen and visitors are more likely to view you as human and want to engage with your company and your job forms.

Bonus 2: Get an Added Boost From a Leading Recruiter

The biggest danger in these elements is the “oversell.” You need a blend of company culture, values, work, and staff to land the right candidates. The problem is that the best combination of these elements differs for each candidate.

Recruiters can help you understand what a person values most because we’re able to ask before your meeting, helping you prepare and ensuring you address what’s most important to them.

After the interview, we can also provide additional information to your preferred candidates, positioning you as better than the competition in areas that are important to the candidate as well as following up with benefits or discussing how you’ve followed up on interview promises with examples of career advancement, company growth and more.

Candidates typically see recruiters as impartial representatives, so it adds an extra value and weight when we discuss your company’s benefits and how they fit with the candidate’s goals. It’s a boost you can only get from a leading recruiter who understands you, your market and the people you want to hire.

When you’re ready to give your company the best opportunity possible in finding the right candidate to fit your skills needs and culture, contact The James Allen Companies, Inc. or call me directly at (573) 334-3688.

4 Best Practices for Targeting Mid-Level Career Talent

4 Best Practices for Targeting Mid-Level Career Talent

Your Company Needs to Approach Staffing Differently, and We’re Here to Help

Professionals in the middle of their careers and those entering middle management are the lifeblood of an organization, driving the specific actions that generate revenue. They are your front line in profitability and managing teams, making them vital to your future.

Unfortunately, demographic trends are leaving most companies without a growing middle-managerial staff. If you have not yet experienced this, you may soon find your organization in a position where your top talent is retiring, leaving a younger, less-experienced staff to take the reins, which can pose a significant risk to your operations.

Companies like yours are already fighting this problem by being prepared and creating long-lasting relationships with recruiters. At The James Allen Companies, we’re helping organizations like yours find the people they need, giving leadership the tools it needs to understand and assess these risks.

We have outlined four key points that drive the successful recruitment of your mid-level career talent and create a pipeline of leadership that propels you forward.

Prepare for the Market

Today’s labor market is undergoing significant change. As more industries move into the digital arena, we’re seeing positions shift in-house from outsourced operations, creating a greater workload and demand on staffs.

Specifically, for markets like yours, we see three big career trends hitting in 2017:

  1. Economists say the unemployment rate will fall further as the year progresses, so you’ll be facing a tighter race in the War for Talent. Prepare for increased discussions on salaries, benefits, perks, and a mix of new demands that may include telework or family leave options.
  2. Succession plans are vital, now more than ever as a greater number of Baby Boomers continue to retire. This is also the time to transform positions so as to make them more appealing to a more modern workforce (and save money in the long-term).
  3. Watch to see if your competition turns to staffing consultants. In 2015 and 2016, enterprises spent heavily to create relationships with a wide number of recruiters. At the end of 2016 and moving into 2017, that practice started moving to smaller companies as they became better aware of the ROI and competitive advantage it garnered them.

These trends imply that nearly every organization is going to need to change the way it thinks about recruiting and talent retention.

Take Time to Learn Your Audience

Who do you picture when you think of a mid-career employee? What attributes do you give them? How experienced are they? What do they care about?

These questions can help you begin to understand and approach mid-level career talent. And as you ask these questions, you may be surprised to learn that Millennials are entering your target zone.

Born as early as 1980, the first Millennials are in their late 30s and may have as much as 15 years of true professional experience. They’re not only hitting their stride, but they’re making a bigger mark than anyone else today. In April of 2016, Millennials officially became the largest generation in America, roughly one year after they became the largest generation in the labor force (by 2020, nearly half of all U.S. workers will be Millennials).

If you’re looking for talent that is ready to grow with your company, has years to stay in similar positions, plus has plenty of room to grow, make sure you’re looking in the right place and tailoring your business to meet them.

In regards to Millennials, it’s important to espouse your brand’s social responsibility efforts and stances. They’re not the first generation to want companies to give back — Gen X is sometimes even more demanding of this — so many companies already have a cause or purpose. It is vital that your cause is articulated on your website, in your promotional materials and in your interviews.

Put Your Company in Terms of Their Goals

Identifying your audience allows you to understand where they want to go in their career. In today’s professionals, from Boomers to Millennials, one of the more significant pushes is to view their employer as a flexible partner who provides meaningful work.

The days of demanding the big expense account and corner office are ending for most employees who are in the beginning and middle of their careers. They want to know that career and lifestyle can be balanced. But they’re also more willing to take work with them during those afternoons and weekends, so you have an opportunity to be considered a relationship as much as a source of income.

Present your company through individual connections: meetings and phone calls with candidates you’re interested in, instead of doing everything through email. When you’ve narrowed down your selection, try to add a personal touch when you recruit.

Develop a Relationship with a Committed Recruiter

Most of today’s businesses need to hire specific talent, but they have a small HR staff that’s already overwhelmed. If you’re in this situation, what do you do?

Instead of obtaining the services of a vendor, work to build a strategic, long-term relationship with a reliable partner who understands the nuances of your industry and can help you find quality candidates quickly. If you create this relationship before your need becomes critical, you’ll have someone in your corner who understands and can help your business.

Together we can develop a clear workforce plan that will help you expedite your hiring process and can even anticipate needs before they happen. Our goal is to save you money over the long-term by reducing turnover rates and letting you spend time with top talent, instead of having to sort through a mountain of resumes.

When you’re ready to find the right candidates for your mid-level positions and leadership opportunities by changing the way you think about creating a talent pipeline, contact The James Allen Companies, Inc. or call me directly at (573) 334-3688.